Tuesday, October 9, 2018

First Lady Melania Trump Visits Egypt


Photo: The White House

THE WHITE HOUSE
Office of the First Lady
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 6, 2018

First Lady Melania Trump’s Visit to Cairo, Egypt

First Lady Melania Trump landed in Cairo, Egypt on Saturday Morning.  Entissar Amer, the First Lady of the Arab Republic of Egypt and Thomas Goldberger, the Chargé d’Affaires of the United States Embassy to Egypt, greeted Mrs. Trump.

The first stop in Egypt was to Ittihadiya Palace for a meeting with President Abdel Fattah Al Sisi of Egypt and First Lady Lady Entissar Amer. Mrs. Trump discussed her focus and goals of supporting children all over the world in order to ensure future generations have every opportunity to grow up and contribute to society in meaningful and positive ways.

Following the meeting, the First Lady met with the Chargé d’Affaires, Thomas Goldberger and his wife Eden Goldberger, and staff of the United States Embassy, thanking them for their service to the United States.

Mrs. Trump visited a few of Egypt’s many cultural sites including the Sphinx, and the Great Pyramid – one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. While there, she also received a briefing about USAID’s Water Table Reduction Project at the base of the Sphinx.

“I want to thank President Abdel Fattah Al Sisi and First Lady Entissar Amer for hosting me in Egypt,” said First Lady Melania Trump. “It was a nice opportunity to see the pyramids in person, which are truly a historical treasure. We must always do our best to preserve such important historical sites, and I was so pleased to learn of the work that USAID has done to help with preservation efforts at the base of the Sphinx.”

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First Lady Melania Trump Visits Kenya

Photo: The White House

THE WHITE HOUSE
Office of the First Lady
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 5, 2018

Readout of First Lady Melania Trump’s Visit to Nairobi, Kenya

First Lady Melania Trump arrived in Nairobi, Kenya late on Thursday evening.  She was greeted by the First Lady of the Republic of Kenya, Margaret Kenyatta and the United States Ambassador to the Republic of Kenya, Robert Godec.

On the morning of Friday, October 5, Mrs. Trump traveled to Nairobi National Park. Upon arrival, she went to the Sheldrick Elephant Orphanage to learn about their facilities and mission and to observe the staff engage in their daily routine of feeding the baby elephants rescued by the shelter. Mrs. Trump, joined by Mrs. Kenyatta, fed the baby elephants with large bottles of milk. After the feeding concluded, Mrs. Trump spoke with briefly Angela Sheldrick, the owner of Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, and Edwin Lusuchi, the Chief Elephant Keeper.

On the Safari, the First Lady was able to see many wild animals including zebras, hippos, rhinos, and giraffes. Along the way, Mrs. Trump was briefed by Nelly Palmeris, the senior warden of Nairobi National Park, about the conservation efforts of the Kenya Wildlife Service. Near the end of the tour, Mrs. Trump visited one of the ivory burn sites, which are important landmarks in conservation, where Kenyan president Daniel arap Moi made a dramatic statement to poachers by setting fire to 11 tons of seized ivory in 1989.

Following her visit at Nairobi National Park, Mrs. Trump visited the Nest Baby Village part of the Nest Children’s Home, which cares for children ages newborn to 17 whose mothers are imprisoned. This shelter focuses on children by providing them with clothing and food, emotional support, medical care, and educational opportunities.

Director and founder of the Nest Children’s Home, Irene Baumgartner, greeted the First Lady. Children sang and danced around Mrs. Trump to welcome her and escorted her to the nursery village. Mrs. Trump met with the staff and held many of the babies. Outside in the gardens, older children sang to the First Lady. Mrs. Trump read a story titled The Lion and the Mouse. Before departing, the children circled the First Lady for a prayer and each child gave her a flower.

The shelter, which has been in operation since 1994, is a charitable trust that relies solely on private donations. The First Lady donated baby blankets, teddy bears, and children’s bags containing several items, including Frisbees and water bottles.

In the late afternoon, Mrs. Trump joined Mrs. Kenyatta at the State House for a private meeting where they discussed their shared goals within their respective countries – noting the importance of maternal health and education for children. First Lady Melania Trump and First Lady Margaret Kenyatta visited the Nairobi National Theater for a cultural performance by the Sarakasi Allstars. The audience included children from various schools and programs including the Nest and USAID Nilendi program.

Mrs. Trump also attended an Embassy Meet and Greet in order to thank United States Ambassador Robert Godec and Embassy employees for their service.

“My time in Kenya impacted me greatly and I want to thank everyone who took the time to meet with me, especially Mrs. Kenyatta,” said First Lady Melania Trump. “The hospitality that I received made the experience so special. I was awed by the beauty of Nairobi National Park and was very interested to learn more about Kenya’s conservation efforts. The Nest is a prime example of what it means to protect and nurture our next generation – seeing their efforts shape the lives of so many children is something I will never forget. I look forward to visiting again in the future.”

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Photos: The White House

Nest Children's Home - Limuru, Kenya

Kenya National Theater, Nairobi

David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust - Nairobi, Kenya

Nairobi National Park

 Nest Children's Home - Limuru, Kenya

First Lady Melania Trump Visits Malawi

Photo: The White House

THE WHITE HOUSE
Office of the First Lady
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 4, 2018

Readout of First Lady Melania Trump’s Visit to Lilongwe, Malawi

First Lady Melania Trump arrived in Lilongwe, Malawi, known as the “warm heart of Africa,” on Thursday afternoon. Mrs. Trump was greeted at the airport by the First Lady of Malawi, Gertrude Mutharika, and her granddaughter, who handed Mrs. Trump flowers. Children and dancers performed at the arrival ceremony.

The First Lady traveled to the Chipala Primary School, and was greeted by the Minister of Education, Science, and Technology, Bright Msaka and the Head Teacher, Maureen Masi. Over 8,000 students attend the school. The facility has 22 classrooms with an average class size of approximately 106 students per class. The First Lady toured the classrooms, observed an English lesson, and later met with teachers, parents, and local school management.

At a textbook handover ceremony, the First Lady discussed the importance of educating and empowering youth and lauded USAID’s continued efforts to increase access to education for children in Malawi. Before departing the school, Mrs. Trump stopped in the schoolyard to watch students play soccer with a few of the soccer balls that she donated. Along with the soccer balls, the First Lady donated other Be Best items including tote bags with classroom supplies inside for the teachers, as well as Frisbees for the children.

“The growth and success of a country starts with educating our children,” said First Lady Melania Trump. “I want to thank the teachers and children at Chipala Primary school for today’s warm welcome and commend the staff for their commitment to providing their students the education and tools needed to grow and to be able to contribute to a prosperous society. The positivity and passion to learn was so evident in each classroom, and I appreciate the time everyone took to show me around the school.”

Following the school visit, Mrs. Trump met with Ambassador Virginia Palmer and the Embassy staff, thanking them for their service on behalf of the United States and their continued efforts in Malawi. Mrs. Trump is the first United States First Lady to visit Malawi.

Mrs. Trump then visited First Lady Mutharika at the State House. The two had a productive discussion around the importance of ensuring education and resources are available for all children. The visit also included a cultural performance on the rooftop garden of the State House.

“Thank you to Professor Mutharika and the many other key leaders in Malawi who made me feel very welcome today. This visit showed me the warmth and kindness of Malawi and the incredible efforts that support the growth of education for children. I look forward to returning to Malawi in the future.”

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Photos: The White House

Malawi State House

With First Lady Gertrude Mutharika,
Malawi State House

Chipala Primary School, Lilongwe

Lilongwe International Airport

Lilongwe International Airport

 Chipala Primary School, Lilongwe

First Lady Melania Trump Visits Ghana

Photo: The White House

THE WHITE HOUSE
Office of the First Lady
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 3, 2018

Readout of First Lady Melania Trump’s Visit to Accra and Cape Coast, Ghana

First Lady Melania Trump arrived in Accra, Ghana Tuesday morning.  Mrs. Trump was greeted by the First Lady of the Republic of Ghana, Rebecca Akufo-Addo and the Chargé d’Affaires of the United States Embassy to Ghana, Christopher Lamora.  Flowers were presented to Mrs. Trump and local schoolchildren greeted her waving United States and Ghanaian flags.  Mrs. Trump was welcomed to the Jubilee Lounge for an official meeting with Mrs. Akufo-Addo.

In the afternoon, accompanied by USAID Administrator, Mark Green, Mrs. Trump visited the Greater Accra Regional Hospital, also known as Ridge Hospital.  The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) provides robust assistance to this hospital, specifically to support maternal, newborn, and child health.  The First Lady and Administrator Green  were met by Mrs. Akufo-Addo, the Hospital Medical Director, Dr. Emmanuel Srofenyoh and the Minister of Gender, Children and Social Protection, Cynthia Morrison, who escorted them on a tour of the hospital.  The first stop was to the old wing of the hospital, the Child Welfare Clinic, where they observed how newborns were weighed with cloth bags hanging from a scale, and their vitals recorded in a ledger.  The medical staff showed Mrs. Trump and Administrator Green how they educate new mothers on infant care and the importance of immunizations and good nutrition.  The second stop was to the new wing of the hospital, where the First Lady and her delegation visited the newborn intensive care unit.  Mrs. Trump also had the opportunity to meet with new mothers being trained in the hospital’s Kangaroo Mother Care – a method used in caring for premature babies where infants are held skin-to-skin with the mother.  Before departing, Mrs. Trump donated baby blankets, teddy bears, weighing sacks, and diaper bags to the hospital.  All donations were personally selected by the First Lady.

The First Lady then traveled to the Jubilee House to meet with Mrs. Akufo-Addo at her residence on the grounds, where they discussed the importance of maternal and newborn health in all communities.

In the afternoon, the First Lady met with the Chargé d’Affaires, Christopher Lamora, and his staff at the United States Embassy to thank them for their service to the United States.

On Wednesday morning, Mrs. Trump traveled to the central region of Ghana to meet with Chieftains at Emintsimadze Palace and tour Cape Coast Castle, one of about 40 castles used in the trans-Atlantic slave trade.  As is custom, before touring Cape Coast Castle, Mrs. Trump had an audience at Emintsimadaze Palace with Cape Coast’s Paramount Chief, Osabarimba Kwesi Atta II and chieftains to be granted permission to visit the Cape Coast Castle.  During a cultural ceremony, the chieftains gifted the First Lady with a traditional Kente cloth, hand-made sandals, and a hand-made necklace and bracelet.

Following her visit to Emintsimadze Palace, Mrs. Trump walked throughout Cape Coast Castle, visiting significant locations, including rooms that were formerly used as slave dungeons.  The First Lady placed wreaths in the Male Dungeon and the Female Insurgents’ Cell in memory of the tens of thousands of innocent people brutally impacted by the cruel injustices that took place at Cape Coast.

“I want to thank the people of Ghana for such a wonderful visit and the opportunity to learn about their history and culture,” said First Lady Melania Trump. “My time in your country was filled with so many meaningful stops.  It was encouraging to see the commitment and compassion of Ridge Hospital staff and their focus on maternal and newborn health, and I want to thank Mrs. Akufo-Addo for accompanying me.  I also enjoyed visiting with the Omahen of the Oguaa Traditional Area Cape Coast, Osabarimba Kwesi Atta II, queen mothers, and other traditional leaders at Emintsimadze Palace, and it was an incredibly moving honor to have the opportunity to pay my respects at Cape Coast Castle.  Thank you to President and Mrs. Akufo-Addo for their hospitality and to the hardworking Embassy staff who helped make this visit possible.  I look forward to visiting Ghana again in the future.”

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Photos: The White House

Welcome ceremony at Kotoka International Airport, Accra

NICU, Greater Accra Regional Hospital

With Paramount Chief at Emintsimadze Palace, Cape Coast

 Door of No Return, Cape Coast Castle

Thursday, October 4, 2018

Central African Republic Ratifies Biological Weapons Convention



United States Applauds Central African Republic’s Ratification of the Biological Weapons Convention
09/26/2018 02:29 PM EDT

Media Note
Office of the Spokesperson
Department of State
Washington, DC
September 26, 2018

On September 25, 2018, the Government of the Central African Republic deposited its instrument of ratification to the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BWC) with the U.S. Department of State, one of this treaty’s Depositary Governments. The United States warmly congratulates the Central African Republic for taking this step, which advances the BWC toward the goal of universalization.

The BWC is the key instrument for strengthening international efforts against the threat posed by biological weapons, whether in the hands of state or non-state actors. Maximizing its effectiveness requires that all states become Parties and fully implement its obligations. The United States urges all states not party to the BWC to accede to the treaty without further delay.

First Lady Melania Trump Announces Visit to Africa



THE WHITE HOUSE
Office of the First Lady
For Immediate Release
September 26, 2018

FIRST LADY MELANIA TRUMP ANNOUNCES PLANNED STOPS DURING VISIT TO AFRICA

NEW YORK, NY : In remarks delivered today during a reception she hosted for delegates to the 73rd Meeting of the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA), First Lady Melania Trump announced the stops she will make during her upcoming visit to Africa.

This will be the First Lady’s first major solo international trip.  Mrs. Trump will travel the first week of October to Ghana, Malawi, Kenya, and Egypt.

Since launching her Be Best campaign in May, Mrs. Trump has had the opportunity to meet with children all over the world, promoting successful organizations and programs that share her goal as First Lady of the United States’ supporting and helping children.

“Since becoming First Lady, I have had the privilege of speaking with many of the spouses of world leaders,” said First Lady Melania Trump.  “Our discussions are always united by the universal desire to provide children with the support and tools necessary to grow up happy, healthy, and responsible adults.  I am thrilled to be working with the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) on what I know will be a meaningful trip.”

The First Lady’s Office is working closely with USAID to plan the visits on her upcoming trip. During the trip, Mrs. Trump will learn more about the United States role in providing assistance to help countries become self-sufficient.  Her trip will focus on maternal and newborn care in hospitals, education for children, the deep culture and history woven into each African country, and how the United States is supporting each country on its journey to self-reliance.


FULL UNGA REMARKS BELOW:

Good morning and thank you all for being here today.

Let me begin by thanking Administrator Mark Green for the kind introduction.  I have been so impressed with the work the United States Agency for International Development does around the world, and am excited to work with them on my upcoming trip to Africa.

When I launched BE BEST, it was with the goal of combatting some of the issues that children face today by shining a spotlight on successful programs and organizations that teach children the tools and skills needed for emotional, social and physical well-being.

Since the launch, I have had the opportunity to meet children all over the world, with the goal of talking to them about the importance of healthy living and responsible habits.

Last June I spoke at the Students against Destructive Decisions National Conference – a training program for middle and high school children to become leaders in encouraging their peers to live drug-free lives.

In July, I visited the Royal Hospital Chelsea in London, England, and I met local schoolchildren educated under the motto “the best that we can be.” We spoke at length about the importance of kindness and how each of them lives under their school’s positive motto.

I was also able to visit the Microsoft Innovation and Policy Center to meet with students included in Microsoft’s Council for Digital Good.  The students provide ideas and feedback for Microsoft’s youth-focused online safety policy work.  They had designed art projects representing their individual ideas of what it means to be civil in this digital age.

There are many programs across the country that are doing great things for children, and I believe we can replicate many of these programs overseas.  This is why I am pleased to be working closely with USAID as I prepare for my first major International trip to Africa.  By working with developing countries around the world to help them with their journey to self-reliance, USAID’s work embodies much of what Be Best stands for.

Because of the many successful partnerships they have built in both the public and private sectors, USAID is able to maximize their impact and work towards a time when there will no longer be a need for foreign assistance.  When more people have opportunity, and when societies are freer and more democratic, our own country is safer and stronger.

October 1 will mark the first day of my solo visit to four beautiful and very different countries in Africa – Ghana, Malawi, Kenya, and Egypt – all of which have worked alongside USAID and our partners to make great progress in overcoming some of their biggest challenges.

I’d like to take a moment and thank the First Lady of Ghana for being with us today.  Mrs. Akufo-Addo, I look forward to visiting your country and know we will find ways to continue working together even after my visit.  In Ghana, USAID’s programs have focused on healthcare by supporting efforts to expand the coverage and quality of healthcare for mothers and newborns, and educating women and young children about the importance of proper nutrition.

I see the First Lady of Malawi is also with us today.  Professor Mutharika, thank you for being here.  In Malawi, USAID has demonstrated that education is one of the keys to combatting poverty and promoting prosperity.  Their efforts aim to increase access to education, and work to ensure all children acquire the skills needed to succeed in school and life.  I am very excited to have the opportunity to visit Malawi and better understand how our countries can continue working together for a prosperous future.

I also want to recognize Mrs. Kenyatta, of Kenya.  Wonderful to see you again. It was great to host you in the White House a few weeks ago.  In Kenya, USAID works on a variety of programs, including early-childhood education, wildlife conservation, and HIV prevention.  Mrs. Kenyatta, I look forward to visiting your country and know that together, we will be able to do great things on behalf of children.

My final stop, which is Egypt, will focus on the country’s tourism and conservation projects, but I know that through USAID, we have worked with the people of Egypt to promote an environment in which all groups of society – including women and religious minorities – can lead productive and healthy lives.  In fact, their programs have directly supported a reduction in infant and maternal mortality rates, improved early-grade reading, and restored and preserved historical sites vital to Egypt’s tourism.

USAID’s motto is “From the American People.” I am so proud of the work this Administration is doing through USAID and others, and look forward to the opportunity to take the message of my Be Best campaign to many of the countries, and children, throughout Africa.  Whether it is education, drug addiction, hunger, online safety or bullying, poverty or disease, it is too often children who are hit first, and hardest, across the globe.  Each of us hails from a country with its own unique challenges, but I know in my heart we are united by our commitment to raising the next generation to be happy, healthy and morally responsible adults.

I want to thank you all for being here today, and I look forward to our continued work on behalf of the next generation.

God bless you, your families, each of your countries, and may God bless the United States of America.


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Dep. Sec. Sullivan Meets Sudanese Foreign Minister Dirdeiry Mohamed Ahmed

Deputy Secretary Sullivan Meets With Sudanese Foreign Minister Mohamed Ahmed Al-Dukhairi Al-Dirderi in New York City
Photo: State Department

Deputy Secretary Sullivan’s Meeting With Sudanese Foreign Minister Dirdeiry Mohamed Ahmed
09/26/2018 09:16 AM EDT

Readout
Office of the Spokesperson
Department of State
Washington, DC
September 26, 2018

The statement below is attributable to Spokesperson Heather Nauert:‎

On September 24, Deputy Secretary of State John J. Sullivan met with Sudanese Foreign Minister Dirdeiry Mohamed Ahmed, on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly. The two discussed the strengthening of U.S-Sudan relations, expanding counterterrorism cooperation, addressing human rights, including religious freedom and humanitarian access, and bringing peace to neighboring South Sudan. The United States will remain focused on achieving an end to conflict, supporting an inclusive national political process, and creating an environment for political reform and economic development in Sudan.