Tuesday, May 16, 2017

US Holds Briefing on Nigeria


Africa: Briefing on Nigeria

05/09/2017 04:25 PM EDT

Special Briefing
Nathan Holt
Deputy Director, Office of West African Affairs, Bureau of African Affairs
Via Teleconference
Washington, DC

May 9, 2017

MS NAUERT: Thank you so much. Well, good afternoon, everyone, and thanks for joining us today for the call on Nigeria. We’re joined by Nathan Holt, the deputy director of the Office of West African Affairs in the Bureau of African Affairs. Thank you, sir, for joining us.

As a reminder, today’s call is on the record and it will be embargoed until the conclusion of the call.

And with that, I’ll turn it over to our speaker, Deputy Assistant Secretary Murphy.

MR HOLT: Thank you.

MS NAUERT: Excuse me, Holt. (Laughter.) Pardon me.

MR HOLT: Murphy is a fine name. Thank you very much, Heather, and it’s a pleasure to be here. The title of our discussion is Nigeria, a critical U.S. partner. Nigeria is indeed a critical U.S. partner. Nigeria matters to us because it’s Africa’s most populous country, and depending on the price of oil, it’s either the biggest or the second biggest economy on the continent. With a current population of 182 million, Nigeria is projected to grow to over 400 million over the next few decades, which will leave it by the middle of this century as the fourth-largest country in the world. About half the population is Muslim. Nigeria has influence, as many of you know, not only as an economic power, as a military power. It’s got a vibrant emerging, entrepreneurial class which is the future of that country’s economy. It has also got a vibrant film and music industry which has influence well beyond its borders. And I’d like to point out it has traditions of democracy and free press and religious tolerance, all of which contribute to its resilience and its strength.

In 2015, Nigeria had a very important election. It elected Muhammadu Buhari as president. This represented the first time in Nigerian history that there was a peaceful, democratic transfer of power from one party to an opposition party. It was a milestone not only for Nigeria, but really for Africa as a whole. President Buhari’s electoral platform was that he wanted to fight insecurity, particularly the depredations of Boko Haram and other forces in the northeast. He wanted to grow the Nigerian economy, create jobs for its growing population, and he wanted to fight corruption.

Well, the nice thing about that agenda is that it meshes very well with our own. That is – those are areas of focus that very much are consistent with U.S. interests in Nigeria. We too want to partner with Nigeria and its neighbors to fight terrorism. We too support private-sector-led economic growth. And we are very much in favor of President Buhari’s campaign against corruption. With that as kind of an overview, I’d like to open it up to questions.

MS NAUERT: Okay, let’s take the first question, please.

OPERATOR: And once again, to ask a question, please press * then 1 on your touchtone phone at this time. The question and answer session is open. Once again, to ask a question, please press * then 1 at this time.

MR HOLT: As we wait – as we wait for further questions, a couple of additional points to make to sort of frame the conversation and set a little bit of the context. Nigeria is a very important place for us and it faces enormous obstacles, enormous challenges moving forward. I don’t want to give the impression that any of this is going to be easy. In fact, one of our ways of approaching this country is to point at that perhaps nowhere else on the continent, and maybe few places on the planet, is the gap between the upside potential and the downside risk greater. The future of Nigeria matters not just for Nigeria, but very much for its neighbors and I would argue for this planet. The good news is that on issue after issue, we’ve gone from a place where we were often not on the same page with Nigeria to a place where we see things very much in the same terms.

Some folks may be aware of the humanitarian situation in northeastern Nigeria and its neighboring countries in the Lake Chad Basin. We are a leading donor of humanitarian assistance there, as the countries involved struggle to deal with a food crisis, which is itself a consequence of the Boko Haram and ISIS West Africa insurgency. Many of you will have also followed the news of the release of the Chibok girls over the weekend. Obviously, that was a heartwarming and positive development for the young women involved and for their families. We’d like to point out that they’re among thousands of victims of Boko Haram and its offshoot, ISIS West Africa.

We are engaged with Nigeria and its neighbors not only to provide humanitarian relief to the victims of this insurgency, but to help them as security partners and as intelligence partners to address the security dimensions of this problem and to get at some of the drivers of insecurity. Because at the end of the day, I think we and our partners all recognize there’s no purely military solution. The end of the day, the hopes and aspirations of the people need to met; education and water and basic governance needs to be provided in areas where it has not been provided before. And it’s a joint effort. There are no easy solutions, but we’re in this for the long haul.

That’s a little bit of additional context. I’d like to point out that United States has worked closely with Nigeria. We provide a range of assistance to Nigerian authorities in their efforts to combat Boko Haram and ISIS West Africa. That includes intelligence sharing, training, advice on strategic communications, and various services to support victims of Boko Haram. And as I said, we’ve provided close to $500 million in humanitarian assistance over the last two years to those affected by the conflict in northeastern Nigeria and its neighbors – neighboring countries of Cameroon, Niger, and Chad.

Again, that’s an overview of where we are in a very important bilateral relationship for us. I’d like to point out as well that we’ve worked together closely in the United Nations. We’ve worked together on issues of arms proliferation, nuclear questions. So Nigeria has a voice in Africa that is quite influential. And I’ve worked on Africa for most of my professional career, and it’s very good to be in a good place with this group.

One of the critical consequences of the Boko Haram and ISIS West Africa insurgency, which has been going on since 2009, is that it has produced terrible, terrible consequences for the population. As the militaries have begun to coordinate their activities more effectively, they and other not just military authorities but civilian authorities have gained access to areas previously under the control of Boko Haram. And as that happens, we have all come to understand more clearly the true dimensions of the humanitarian crisis.

So the United Nations has pointed out that there are more people facing famine-like conditions in northeastern Nigeria and in neighboring regions. We’re working as hard as we can and as fast as we can to deliver food assistance and other support to those people. I’ve quoted the numbers on our own humanitarian assistance a couple of time. I think I would add that just on April 28th the United States announced an additional $30 million to support the people of northeast Nigeria through contributions to the World Food Program. The World Food Program, I would add, has expanded the numbers of people it is feeding by tenfold over the last two to three months. So the numbers have gone from roughly 200,000 to close to 2 million. The World Food Program needs additional assistance; we’re working with other donors and partners to get that assistance to them. It’s a collective effort, and none of it’s going to get fixed until the insurgency is defeated and the specter of terrorist violence is eliminated from that area.

I believe there are people online for questions, and I’m happy to answer.

MS NAUERT: And with that – thank you, sir. With that, we’ll take our first question, please.

OPERATOR: Then we go to Matthew Lee with the Associated Press. Please, go ahead.

QUESTION: Yeah, hi. Thanks for this. I realize you probably won’t be able to give an exact answer on this, but with all the discussions about cuts coming to foreign aid, cuts coming to U.S. assistance, U.S. payments to UN programs. Are you able to commit to the continued – continued robust U.S. assistance to Nigeria and other countries in West Africa?

MR HOLT: We’re, again, very – we are very pleased that we are the lead humanitarian donor in the Lake Chad Basin region. We’ve got a vigorous bilateral development assistance program that’s dominated by health assistance, including the PEPFAR program, which has really helped turn back the tide of HIV/AIDS not just in Nigeria but across the African continent.

You’re absolutely right, Matt; I’m not the person who can answer your questions about the future of the U.S. Government budget. We follow that process with great interest. But for now, the focus not only here at State but in partner agencies is to deliver the assistance that we do have available smartly and effectively so that it achieves the results that we intend.

QUESTION: Thank you.

MS NAUERT: Next question, please.

OPERATOR: And ladies and gentlemen, if you wish to ask a question, please press * then 1 at this time.

There appear to be no further questions at this time.

MS NAUERT: Okay. Thank you, everyone, for joining us today, and Nathan Holt, the deputy director of the Office of West African Affairs in the Bureau of African Affairs. Sir, thank you for joining us.

MR HOLT: Thank you, ma’am.

MS NAUERT: Thank you, everyone.

US Issues Statement on Central African Republic

THE WHITE HOUSE
Office of the Press Secretary
May 9, 2017

CONTINUATION OF THE NATIONAL EMERGENCY WITH RESPECT TO THE CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

On May 12, 2014, by Executive Order 13667, the President declared a national emergency to deal with the unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign policy of the United States constituted by the situation in and in relation to the Central African Republic, which has been marked by a breakdown of law and order, intersectarian tension, widespread violence and atrocities, and the pervasive, often forced recruitment and use of child soldiers, and which threatens the peace, security, or stability of the Central African Republic and neighboring states.

The situation in and in relation to the Central African Republic continues to pose an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign policy of the United States.  For this reason, the national emergency declared on May 12, 2014, to deal with that threat must continue in effect beyond May 12, 2017.  Therefore, in accordance with section 202(d) of the National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1622(d)), I am continuing for 1 year the national emergency declared in Executive Order 13667.

This notice shall be published in the Federal Register and transmitted to the Congress.

DONALD J. TRUMP

THE WHITE HOUSE,

May 9, 2017.

US Embassy Officer in Freetown Helps Escort US Fugitive Back to Face Trial

State Department Photo

RSO Freetown Helps Escort U.S. Fugitive Back to Face Trial

April 28, 2017

By Angela French, DSS Public Affairs

Freetown, Sierra Leone, did not turn out to be a refuge for Musa Benson Turay. Turay, a U.S. citizen, fled to his place of birth, Freetown, after the United States indicted him in June 2014 for participating in a $43 million tax fraud scheme that involved stealing identities of disabled children and youth in foster care.

But Turay could not escape DSS’ global reach. The DSS Criminal Investigative Liaison branch tracked Turay to Sierra Leone and alerted Sean Nedd, the Regional Security Officer (RSO) at the U.S. Embassy in Freetown, that Turay was using a local cell phone number. Nedd notified the local police, who put a trace on the phone, allowing Sierra Leonean investigators to identify Turay’s general vicinity. Using an online ruse, the officials pinpointed his exact location.

On November 3, 2016, local law enforcement officials arrested Turay, and detained him while the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) filed a formal extradition request. Turay fought hard against the request, but lost his appeal on March 9, 2017. The U.S. Marshals, who typically escort fugitives back to the United States, were unable to send deputies to Sierra Leone due to logistical obstacles.

Nedd stepped in to complete the mission. He coordinated with local police, DOJ, U.S. Marshals, Brussels Airlines, and DSS colleagues posted at U.S. embassies in Accra, Ghana, and Brussels, Belgium, to complete the fugitive transfer. Nedd, U.S. Embassy Freetown Assistant RSO Noran Tealakh, and Assistant RSO from Embassy Accra Justin Garofalo boarded the plane and escorted Turay to Brussels. They met the U.S. Marshals in Brussels and transferred Turay to their custody March 21, 2017.

Turay currently awaits trial in the United States for his original tax fraud charge.

*** DSS – Department of Social Services

Thursday, May 4, 2017

Notice of Funding Opportunity for Proposals for Resettlement Support Centers (RSC) Africa in Nairobi, Kenya

Funding Opportunity Announcement
Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration
April 27, 2017

Funding Opportunity Number: SFOP0001616

Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) number:
19.018 – Resettlement Support Centers (RSCs) for U.S. Refugee Resettlement

Announcement issuance date: Thursday, April 27, 2017

Proposal submission deadline: Tuesday, June 27, 2017 at 12:00 p.m. noon EDT
Proposals submitted after this deadline will not be considered.

**ADVISORY: All applicants must submit proposals through the website Grants.gov NOT through SAMS Domestic site. Please note that if you apply on the SAMS Domestic site, your application will be disqualified. PRM strongly recommends submitting your proposal early to allow time to address any difficulties that may arise.**

If you are new to PRM funding, the Grants.gov registration process can be complicated. While PRM’s General NGO Guidelines are geared towards overseas assistance programming and not for refugee admissions, you may refer to the section on “Application Process” for information and resources on how to obtain a DUNS number, register with SAM.gov, and register with grants.gov. PRM also strongly encourages organizations that have received funding from PRM in the past to read this section as a refresher.

Full Text of Notice of Funding Opportunity

A. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

I. Purpose of the Resettlement Support Center

The admissions process for refugee applicants seeking resettlement in the United States is overseen by the Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration of the Department of State (the Bureau).

The purpose of Resettlement Support Centers (RSC) Africa, Turkey and the Middle East (TuME), and Eurasia are to assist the Bureau in preparing the necessary casework for persons in selected locations in sub-Saharan Africa, Turkey and Lebanon, and Europe and Central Asia, respectively, eligible for interview by United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) under the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program (USRAP). For those persons approved, the RSC provides assistance in completing the additional requirements for refugee admission under Section 207 of the Immigration and Nationality Act. These requirements include, but are not limited to, completing the required security checks, a medical exam, and attending cultural orientation. In addition, the RSC forwards the necessary data on all DHS-approved cases to the Refugee Processing Center (RPC) in Virginia for distribution to U.S. Reception and Placement agencies according to procedures established by the Bureau.

The Bureau will make one award each for RSC Africa, RSC TuME, and RSC Eurasia based in Nairobi, Kenya; Istanbul, Turkey; and Moscow, Russia; respectively, for an initial period beginning October 1, 2017, through September 30, 2018, subject to the availability of funds. Through the award, the Bureau will provide full financial support to the selected organization, based on the proposal submitted in response to this request.

The organizations selected to operate each RSC are expected to:

1) Provide regional refugee processing services for all U.S. Refugee Admissions Program applicants in:

A.  Sub-Saharan Africa regardless of nationality or ethnicity, beginning on October 1, 2017. The primary office for the RSC shall be located in Nairobi, Kenya, with sub-offices in Kasulu, Tanzania, and Pretoria, South Africa. The Pretoria office will manage all Southern Africa operations from referral to departure while the Kasulu office will aid the Nairobi office with all operations in Kigoma, Tanzania.

B.  Turkey and Lebanon regardless of nationality or ethnicity, beginning on October 1, 2017. The primary office for the RSC shall be located in Istanbul, Turkey, with a sub-office in Beirut, Lebanon.

C.  Europe and Central Asia, except Austria, regardless of nationality or ethnicity, beginning on October 1, 2017. The primary office for the RSC shall be located in Moscow, Russia, with a sub-office in Kyiv, Ukraine.

2) Relate equitably to all domestic resettlement agencies (This includes sharing relevant biographic and other background information with domestic resettlement agencies working in the Reception and Placement program, as appropriate, to facilitate their provision of required sponsorship assurances).

3) Ensure that activities undertaken by the RSC effectively consider the specific and unique protection and assistance needs of potentially vulnerable and underserved groups among the beneficiary population (women; children; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or intersex (LGBTI) individuals; older persons; the sick; persons with disabilities; and others).

II.  Refugee Processing Caseload

As the FY 2018 regional refugee admissions ceiling has not yet been established, it is impossible to predict the precise number of refugee applicants to be processed by each RSC. However, proposals and budgets should be prepared based on a projection of 18,000 departures from the countries covered by RSC Africa; 6,000 departures from the countries covered by RSC TuME; or 2,000 departures from the countries covered by Eurasia. If before or during the agreement period the projected number of individuals to be processed either dramatically falls short of or exceeds the level anticipated in this announcement and the approved proposal, the Bureau will negotiate an amended budget with the RSC.

The following information regarding caseloads and circuit rides in FY 2017 may be helpful in formulating an organization’s proposal and budget for RSC Africa, TuME, or Eurasia for FY 2018:

A.  RSC Africa: Approximately 18,000 refugee departures from sub-Saharan Africa. In order to admit these individuals in FY 2017, RSC Africa will conduct circuit rides to Kenya, Ethiopia, Tanzania, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, Malawi, South Africa, and other African countries.

B.  RSC TuME: Approximately 6,500 departures from Turkey and 1,000 from Lebanon. RSC TuME will conduct circuit rides in Istanbul and Beirut.

C.  RSC Eurasia: Approximately 4,500 refugee departures. RSC will conduct circuit rides to two Emergency Transit Centers (ETC) in Romania and Slovakia, Malta, and countries in Central Asia including Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan.

III. Program Objectives

In an effort to strengthen the quality and integrity of the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program, the Bureau has established the following standardized objectives and indicators, which will be monitored throughout the fiscal year, for each organization serving as RSC Africa, RSC TuME, and RSC Eurasia. In addition to the standardized indicators below, applicants are required to propose at least one additional outcome-based indicator for each objective, including at least one indicator each for cultural orientation, scheduling and coordinating medicals, and coordinating departures under Objective #1. Applicants may include additional objectives and indicators if they choose. In addition, PRM reserves the right to add or change indicators in consultation with applicants during final negotiations prior to award of the cooperative agreement.

A.  RSC completes processing for refugee applicants in accordance with USRAP guidelines and the cooperative agreement.

a.  Percent of target number of refugee applicants pre-screened.

b.  Percent of circuit rides with an average score of 4 or 5 on the DHS Mission Support Feedback Form.

B.  RSC maintains program integrity and protects against fraud and malfeasance, in accordance with PRM Program Integrity Guidelines and the cooperative agreement.

a.  Percent compliance with required measures under Program Integrity Guidelines.

b.  Percent of staff and refugee applicants aware of fraud reporting channels.

C.  RSC management provides oversight and support to maintain a trained and knowledgeable workforce.

a.  Number of RSC staff receiving on-boarding training, and specialized training as needed, to achieve USRAP objectives.

b.  Percent of staff able to demonstrate knowledge required to fulfill their job.

D.  RSC maintains professional and respectful services, environment, and communications with refugee applicants.

a.  Number of refugee applicant inquiries responded to within two weeks.

b.  Percent of refugee applicants reporting satisfaction with quality of interactions with RSC.

IV.  Program Requirements

The Bureau has established the following requirements for each organization serving as RSC Africa, RSC TuME, and RSC Eurasia:

A.  Provide refugee processing services in support of the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program using the Worldwide Refugee Admissions Processing System (WRAPS) and in accordance with procedures established by the Bureau, as needs arise, in:

a. Africa – sub-Saharan Africa;

b. TuME – Turkey and Lebanon;

c. Eurasia – Russia, Ukraine, Malta, two Emergency Transit Centers (ETC) in Romania and Slovakia, and countries in Central Asia including Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan.

B.  Ensure that each potential refugee applicant is screened to determine if he/she is eligible for interview by the Department of Homeland Security under the processing priorities established for his/her nationality.

C.  Conduct pre-screening interviews and casework in the countries listed in section III.A so as to capture all relevant information pertaining to the case, e.g. biographical data, cross-referencing information, special medical needs, information about victims of torture, etc. Ensure that all necessary security name-checks are completed and remain in a valid status for travel in accordance with SOP. Prepare the case file, including completion of all forms necessary for presentation of the case to DHS/USCIS for adjudication.

D.  Enter all required information into WRAPS on a timely basis in adherence with the USRAP manual and RPC Standard Operating Procedures.

E.  Remain in close contact with the RPC, cooperating fully and at all times to ensure that collected refugee information, the WRAPS system, and related equipment remains secure, functional, up to date, and in compliance with State Department guidance where appropriate.

F.  For applicants approved by USCIS, assist the refugees in completing all post-adjudication steps required for admission to the United States. This includes: coordinating with the RPC to obtain sponsorship assurances from Reception and Placement agencies working under cooperative agreements with the Bureau; preparing travel packets; coordinating medical screening; conducting cultural orientation training; and coordinating with the International Organization for Migration on travel arrangements.

G.  Correspond, as necessary, with applicants and partners on relevant case statuses and to obtain, as necessary, information relevant to the applicant’s qualifications for admission.

H.  Provide cultural orientation to approved refugees aged 15 and above in accordance with guidelines developed by the Bureau and described in the publication “Welcome to the United States–A Guidebook for Refugees” (CAL, 2012) and other materials developed by the current Cultural Orientation Technical Assistance provider (see http://coresourceexchange.org/cultural-orientation/teaching/)

I.  Develop a formal curriculum, in consultation with the Bureau, for cultural orientation training for refugees that will prepare them for travel and initial adjustment to life in the United States. Develop a training and management plan, in consultation with the Bureau, for RSC staff who will conduct cultural orientation training. Conduct cultural orientation in such a way as to achieve performance outcomes as delineated by the Bureau.

The cultural orientation training will cover, at a minimum, the following subjects:
  • Travel
  • Role of the Resettlement Agency
  • Housing
  • Health
  • Cultural Adjustment
  • Rights and Responsibilities
  • Employment
  • Education
B. FEDERAL AWARD INFORMATION

Proposed Program Start Date: October 1, 2017.

Duration of Activity: An initial period beginning October 1, 2017, through September 30, 2018, subject to the availability of funds. This agreement may be renewable for up to two additional fiscal years based upon budget submissions on an annual basis. Continued funding after the initial 12-month award requires the submission of a noncompeting single year proposal narrative and budget and will be contingent upon available funding, strong performance, and continuing need. At the end of three years, if the need to operate the RSC continues, the Bureau will re-compete the project, and the recipient of this award may participate in that process. In funding a project one year, PRM makes no representations that it will continue to fund the project in successive years.

Funding Limits:

For organizations competing for RSC TuME, project proposals must not be more than $14,000,000 per year or they will be disqualified.

For organizations competing for RSC Eurasia, project proposals must not be more than $5,500,000 per year or they will be disqualified.

For organizations competing for RSC Africa, project proposals must not be more than $20,000,000 per year or they will be disqualified.

C.  ELIGIBILITY INFORMATION
  1.  Eligible Applicants: Organizations eligible to submit proposals include entities that have demonstrated satisfactory performance working as a U.S. Department of State-funded organization with the United State Refugee Admissions Program, domestically or overseas, within the last five years.
Organizations must also meet the following requirements in order to be considered as candidates to operate the RSC:

(a) Be one of the following types of organization:

a.  Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with IRS, other than institutions of higher education;
b.  Nonprofits without 501(c)(3) status with IRS, other than institutions of higher education; or
c.  International Organizations. International multilateral organizations should not submit proposals through Grants.gov in response to this Notice of Funding Opportunity announcement. Multilateral organizations that are seeking funding for programs relevant to this announcement should submit their proposal by email to the relevant PRM Program Officer (as listed below) on or before the closing date of the funding announcement.

(b) Be authorized, or eligible for authorization, by the host governments, in particular:
  1. Africa: Be authorized, or eligible for authorization, by the Governments of Kenya, Tanzania, and South Africa to conduct activities relating to the processing of refugees for eventual resettlement in the three countries. This should be understood, when required by each government’s law, to include registration with or receipt of project approval from any relevant country ministry, agency or other official organ with jurisdiction over any activity to be conducted by the RSC.
  2. TuME: Be authorized, or eligible for authorization, by the Government of Turkey to conduct activities relating to the processing of refugees for eventual resettlement of refugees in Turkey. This should be understood, when required by Turkish law, to include registration with or receipt of project approval from any relevant Ministry, agency, or other official organ with jurisdiction over any activity to be conducted by the RSC.
  3. Eurasia: Be authorized, or eligible for authorization, by the Government of Russia to conduct activities related to the processing of refugees for eventual resettlement of refugees in Russia. In addition, all non-governmental organization applicants must have a Certificate of Registration issued by the Federal Government per the Federal Laws Governing Non-Profit Organizations prior to March 16, 2017. International organizations must be accredited by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs confirming that the organization is authorized by the government to conduct its activities as of March 16, 2017.
(c) Have evidence of effective coordination with U.S. government agencies, non-governmental organizations, and international organizations involved with the refugee admissions program.

(d) Possess management capacity at the agency’s headquarters sufficient to oversee the operation of the RSC.

(e) Proposals must have a concrete implementation plan with well-conceived objectives and indicators that are specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and reliable, time-bound, and trackable (SMART), have established baselines, and include at least one outcome or impact indicator per objective; objectives should originate from the Program Objectives listed under Section III above. Applicants may include additional objectives and indicators if they choose.

Failure to satisfy the above requirements will preclude any further consideration of a proposal.

In addition, the Worldwide Refugee Admissions Processing System (WRAPS) is deployed in all refugee processing sites. The use of WRAPS is mandatory, and the RSC must therefore establish itself as WRAPS-ready. Equipment that will be procured by the RSC and related costs must be included in the proposal. (See Appendix C for a list of hardware and software items that are currently needed to access and/or operate WRAPS, including the equipment to operate the Circuit Ride functionality.)

2.  Cost Sharing or Matching: Cost sharing, matching, or cost participation is not a requirement of an application in response to this funding announcement.

D.  APPLICATION AND SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS

 1.  Address to Request Application Package:
Application packages may be downloaded from the website www.Grants.gov.

2.  Content and Form of Application:
Each organization requesting consideration for an award from the Bureau must submit all information as requested below. Applicants should report all data in terms of the federal fiscal year (i.e., October 1 through September 30).

(a) Proposal Format:

Applicants should adhere to the following guidelines when preparing proposals:
  • All documents in the proposal should have the following page layout: 8.5 inch by 11 inch pages with one-inch margins.
  • All documents in the proposal should be in 12-point Times New Roman font.
  • All pages of the proposal should be numbered. Sections within each narrative should be sequential.
  • No attachments other than those specifically requested will be considered.
Proposals that are incomplete and/or fail to respond to all specific required elements as outlined in this proposal announcement may not be found competitive. If the Bureau requests clarifications regarding information included in the proposal, failure to provide this information by the date specified may also preclude further consideration of the proposal.

(b)_Required Documents:

 Each agency interested in applying to operate RSC Africa, RSC TuME, or RSC Eurasia from October 1, 2017, through September 30, 2018, must submit the information specified below. Responses should be presented in the same order as the requirements listed below, with each section numbered to reflect the corresponding section under Required Information. If any individual requirement is not applicable, that should be specifically stated and explained in the proposal:

A.  Signed Completed Form SF-424, SF-424A, and SF-424B.

B.  Proof of Eligibility per sections A and C above.

C.  Project Narrative for the initial year of the program period in the format described below.

D.  Proposed organization chart for the RSC.

E.  Budget summary and budget detail for the initial year of the program period (using suggested format provided in Attachment A and instructions in Appendix A).

F.  Budget narrative for the initial year of the program period (see Appendix B for instructions).

G.  Objectives and Indicators Chart

H.  Risk Analysis (using the suggested format and instructions provided in Appendix C).

I.  Copy of the organization’s Code of Conduct (required before an award can be made). PRM strongly supports the Inter-Agency Standing Committee’s (IASC) Plan of Action to protect beneficiaries of humanitarian assistance from sexual exploitation and abuse. PRM partners must have Codes of Conduct consistent with the IASC’s six core principles signed and implemented within their organizations. Applicants should include codes of conduct as an attachment to the proposal application. (IASC’s core principles document can be found at: https://interagencystandingcommittee.org/system/files/legacy_files/IASC%20english%20POA%20and%20report.pdf)

PRM further encourages NGO partners to develop clearly articulated policies to both respond to and prevent this type of abuse.

J.  Copy of the organization’s Organizational Framework on Accountability to Affected Populations (required before an award can be made). PRM requires applicants to submit an organizational accountability framework that discusses how the organization will ensure collection and analysis of beneficiary feedback, and how beneficiary feedback will be used to change programming decisions where appropriate. We encourage partners to align their AAP frameworks with the IASC’s Five Commitments to Accountability to Affected Populations, available here. PRM will consider funding activities aimed at incorporating beneficiary feedback, as part of overall program budgets. Additional resources on accountability to affected populations can be found at the Core Humanitarian Standard Alliance Frequently Asked Questions on AAP resource page.

K.  Copy of the organization’s Security Plan (required before an award can be made).

L.  Most recent Negotiated Indirect Cost Rate Agreement (NICRA), if applicable.

M.  NGOs that have not received PRM funding since the U.S. government fiscal year ending September 30, 2004 must be prepared to demonstrate that they meet the financial and accounting requirements of the U.S. Government by submitting copies of 1) the most recent external financial audit, 2) proof of non-profit tax status including under IRS 501 (c)(3), as applicable, 3) a Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number, and 4) an Employer ID (EIN)/Federal Tax Identification number.

N.  Organizations that received PRM funding in FY 2017 for activities that are being proposed for funding under this announcement must include the most recent quarterly program and budget report. If an organization’s last quarterly report was submitted more than six weeks prior to the submission of a proposal in response to this funding announcement, the organization must include, with its most recent quarterly report, updates that show any significant progress made on objectives since the last report.

O.  Completed PRM Award Data Sheet (required before an award can be made).

(c) Project Narrative:

The Project Narrative must contain the following sections and should adhere to the requirements listed below:
  • The Project Narrative should be subtitled and numbered to correspond with the required information sections below. If any individual section of information is not applicable, that fact should be specifically stated.
  • Note that page numbers should be sequential for the entirety of the Project Narrative and should not restart with each section of required information.
  • Submit the Project Narrative as an attachment by selecting the “Project Narrative Attachment Form” in the Grant Application Package.
i) Organizational Structure & Management
  • How the applicant will meet the expectations outlined in Section I (Purpose of the Resettlement Support Center) above, including a detailed gender analysis (see above. Required before an award can be made).
  • Its organizational structure, including the number of headquarters staff (to be described in terms of “Full Time Equivalent” positions) that will be assigned to oversee RSC Africa, RSC TuME, or RSC Eurasia.
  • The number of local and international staff to be assigned to the RSC and staffing patterns.
  • Local and headquarters management and oversight policies.
ii) Processing
  • How the organization will establish an operation to handle the processing of the caseload described in Section II above and meet program requirements as outlined in Section III. This includes the implementation of Standard Operating Procedures at every stage of processing.
  • Its communication strategy for disseminating information to refugees, while adhering to privacy and confidentiality guidelines. How the applicant will respond to PRM inquiries about specific cases.
  • How the applicant will collaborate with UNHCR, NGOs, IOM and others that work on resettlement issues.
iii) Cultural Orientation
  • How the applicant will develop and implement a formal curriculum for cultural orientation training for refugees that will prepare them for travel and initial adjustment to life in the United States and meet program requirements as outlined in Section III.
iv) Training, Monitoring & Oversight
  • How the applicant will develop and implement an annual and new staff training and management plan for all RSC staff.
  • How the applicant proposes internal monitoring of its processing and cultural orientation activities under the Cooperative Agreement.
  • How the applicant will establish and document procedures for fraud mitigation and response.
  • How the organization will provide timely and accurate reports on processing and orientation activities.
  • The organization should identify the Bureau’s point of contact at the headquarters office and at the RSC.
  • In addition to PRM’s standardized indicators, what objectives and indicators the applicant proposes to use to measure the success of its operations. Focus on outcome or impact indicators as much as possible. At a minimum, each objective should have one outcome or impact indicator. Wherever possible, baselines should be established before the start of the project.
v) Gender Analysis

PRM is committed to ensuring that RSC services are fully accessible to potentially vulnerable and underserved individuals among the beneficiary population (women; children; older individuals; individuals with complex medical conditions; individuals with disabilities; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or intersex (LGBTI) individuals and other minorities). The gender analysis should specifically analyze the factors that either promote or undermine gender equality within a given program and specifically address the needs of women and girls.

Applicants should:
  • Describe the gender dynamics within the target population (i.e., roles, power dynamics, and different needs of men and women, girls and boys),
  • Briefly analyze the specific risks and challenges posed by gender dynamics to RSC Program implementation, and
  • Explain how the program activities will mitigate these risks and be made accessible to affected groups (particularly women and girls).
vi) Accountability to Affected Populations (AAP) Framework
  • PRM now requires applicants to include in their proposal an organizational framework on accountability to affected populations prior to an award being issued.
  • The framework should be three to five pages in length, discuss collection and analysis techniques, and explain how beneficiary feedback will be used to change programming decisions where appropriate. We encourage partners to align their AAP frameworks with the Inter-Agency Standing Committee’s Five Commitments to Accountability to Affected Populations.
  • PRM will consider funding activities aimed at incorporating beneficiary feedback as part of overall program budgets. If an applicant’s headquarters has already submitted an organizational AAP framework to PRM as part of a separate proposal they may submit the same framework for this proposal.
vii) Risk Analysis
  • PRM now requires applicants to include in their proposal a risk analysis as a separate document. The risk analysis should address any potential programmatic or administrative risks, including that of fraud or corruption, and should assess the level of risk that the proposed program may inadvertently benefit terrorists or their supporters specific to the proposed project.
  • As applicable, proposals must include plans to mitigate risk factors. Applicants are urged to submit the risk analysis in the format of the template provided in Attachment B and on Grants.gov.
(d) Objectives and Indicators Chart:

Applicants should submit a chart (see Attachment C) detailing proposed objectives and indicators for FY 2018. At a minimum, charts should include the program objectives and indicators in Section III above. Applicants are encouraged to include additional outcome or impact indicators that reflect the way in which their organization measures and evaluates achievement of program goals and objectives. Proposed objectives and indicators should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and reliable, time-bound, and trackable (SMART), and should be clearly linked to the program purpose highlighted in Section A.I of this notice of funding opportunity. Note that these objectives and indicators will inform ongoing Bureau evaluation of agency performance, including via quarterly program reports and annual monitoring of RSC operations.

(e) Attachments:

The following attachments are available on www.Grants.gov under this funding opportunity announcement:
  • Attachment A: Budget Detail & Summary Template (Excel)
  • Attachment B: Risk Analysis Template (Word)
  • Attachment C: FY 2018 Resettlement Support Center (RSC) Objectives and Indicators (Word)
Appendix A: Budget Detail Instructions

Appendix B: Budget Narrative Instructions

Appendix C: WRAPS Equipment/Software Requirements

3.  Dun and Bradstreet Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) Number and System for Award Management (SAM)

(a) Each applicant is required to: (i) be registered in SAM.gov before submitting its application; (ii) provide a valid DUNS number in its application; and (iii) continue to maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which it has an active PRM award or an application or plan under consideration by PRM. No federal award may be made to an applicant until the applicant has complied with all applicable DUNS and SAM requirements and, if an applicant has not fully complied with the requirements by the time the PRM award is ready to be made, PRM may determine that the applicant is not qualified to receive a PRM award and use that determination as a basis for making a PRM award to another applicant.

(b) Proposals must be submitted via Grants.gov (not via SAMS Domestic).
Grants.gov registration requires a DUNS number and active SAM.gov registration. If you are new to PRM funding, the Grants.gov registration process can be complicated. We urge you to refer to the “Application Process” section in PRM’s General NGO Guidelines for information and resources to help ensure that the application process runs smoothly. PRM also strongly encourages organizations that have received funding from PRM in the past to read this section as a refresher. Applicants may also refer to the “Applicant Resources” page on Grants.gov for complete details on requirements.).

(c) Do not wait until the last minute to submit your application on Grants.gov. Organizations not registered with Grants.gov should register well in advance of the deadline as it can take up to two weeks to finalize registration (sometimes longer for non-U.S. based NGOs to get the required registration numbers). We also recommend that organizations, particularly first-time applicants, submit applications via Grants.gov no later than one week before the deadline to avoid last-minute technical difficulties that could result in an application not being considered. PRM partners must maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which they have an active federal award or an application under consideration by PRM or any federal agency.

(d) When registering with Grants.gov, organizations must designate points of contact and Authorized Organization Representatives (AORs). Organizations based outside the United States must also request and receive an NCAGE code prior to registering with SAM.gov. Applicants experiencing technical difficulties with the SAM registration process should contact the Federal Service Desk (FSD) online or at 1866-606-8220 (U.S.) and 1-334-206-7828 (International).

(e) Applications must be submitted under the authority of the Authorized Organization Representative (AOR) at the applicant organization. Having proposals submitted by agency headquarters helps to avoid possible technical problems.

(f) If you encounter technical difficulties with Grants.gov please contact the Grants.gov Help Desk at support@grants.gov or by calling 1-800-518-4726.

(g) It is the responsibility of each applicant to ensure the appropriate registrations are in place and active. Failure to have the appropriate organizational registrations in place is not considered a technical difficulty and is not justification for an alternate means of submission.

(h) Pursuant to U.S. Code, Title 218, Section 1001, stated on OMB Standard Form 424 (SF-424), the Department of State is authorized to consolidate the certifications and assurances required by Federal law or regulations for its federal assistance programs. The list of certifications and assurances can be found here:

(i) In accordance with 2 CFR §200.113, Mandatory disclosures, the non-Federal entity or applicant for a Federal award must disclose, in a timely manner, in writing to the Federal awarding agency or pass-through entity all violations of Federal criminal law involving fraud, bribery, or gratuity violations potentially affecting the Federal award. Non-Federal entities that have received a Federal award including the term and condition outlined in Appendix XII—Award Term and Condition for Recipient Integrity and Performance Matters are required to report certain civil, criminal, or administrative proceedings to SAM. Failure to make required disclosures can result in any of the remedies described in 2 CFR §200.338 Remedies for noncompliance, including suspension or debarment. (See also 2 CFR part 180, 31 U.S.C. 3321, and 41 U.S.C. 2313.)

A few tips:
  • Limit file attachment name. File attachment names longer than approximately 50 characters can cause problems to Grants.gov processing the application package.
  • Use numbers to indicate correct sequence (example: 1_proposal.doc; 2_budgetnarrative.doc)
  • Do not use any special characters (example: %, /, #) or spacing in the file name or for word separation. The exception is an underscore, which Grants.gov says can be used in naming attachments. (example: my_Attached_File.pdf)
4.  Submission Dates and Times

Announcement issuance date: Thursday, April 27, 2017

Proposal submission deadline: Tuesday, June 27, 2017 at 12:00 p.m. noon EDT

5.  Intergovernmental Review – Not Applicable.

6.  Funding Restrictions

Federal awards will not allow reimbursement of Federal Award costs without prior authorization by PRM.

7.  Other Submission Requirements

(a) Funding and Funding Procedures: The Bureau intends to award a single Cooperative Agreement to a qualified organization to provide the required services for each RSC as follows: RSC Africa based in Nairobi, Kenya; Kasulu, Tanzania; and Pretoria, South Africa; RSC TuME based in Istanbul, Turkey with operations in Beirut, Lebanon; and RSC Eurasia based in Moscow, Russia with operations in Kyiv, Ukraine. The organization with which the Bureau enters into a Cooperative Agreement for each RSC will be funded for all approved costs associated with providing the required processing services according to a budget agreed upon between the Bureau and the organization (see Appendix A and B for budget preparation instructions) and based on the proposal submitted in response to this request.

(b) Branding and Marking Strategy: Unless exceptions have been approved by the designated bureau Authorizing Official, at a minimum, the following provision will be included whenever assistance is awarded:
  •  The Recipient shall recognize the United States Government’s funding for activities specified under this award at the project site with a graphic of the U.S. flag accompanied by one of the following two phrases based on the level of funding for the award:
  1. Fully funded by the award: “Gift of the United States Government”
  2. Partially funded by the award: “Funding provided by the United States Government”
Exemptions from this requirement may be allowable but must be agreed to in writing by the Grants Officer.

All programs, projects, assistance, activities, and public communications to foreign audiences, partially or fully funded by the Department, should be marked appropriately overseas with the standard U.S. flag in a size and prominence equal to (or greater than) any other logo or identity. The requirement does not apply to the Recipient’s own corporate communications or in the United States.

The Recipient should ensure that all publicity and promotional materials underscore the sponsorship by or partnership with the U.S. Government or the U.S. Embassy. The Recipient may continue to use existing logos or program materials; however, a standard rectangular U.S. flag must be used in conjunction with such logos.

The U.S. flag may replace or be used in conjunction with the Department of State seal, the U.S. embassy seal, or other DOS program logos.

Sub non-Federal entities (sub-awardees) and subsequent tier sub-award agreements are subject to the marking requirements and the non-Federal entity shall include a provision in the sub non-Federal entity agreement indicating that the standard, rectangular U.S. flag is a requirement.

In the event the non-Federal entity does not comply with the marking requirements as established in the approved assistance agreement, the Grants Officer Representative and the Grants Officer must initiate corrective action with the non-Federal entity.

E.  APPLICATION REVIEW INFORMATION

1.  Criteria: Eligible submissions will be those that comply with the criteria and requirements included in this announcement. In addition, the review panel will evaluate the applications on the following criteria:

(i) Organizational Structure and Management Capacity

(ii) Processing expertise and plan to achieve objectives

(iii) Cultural Orientation

(iv) Training, Monitoring and Oversight, including risk analysis

(v) Accountability to Affected Populations

(vi) Gender Analysis

(vii) Management and Past Performance

(viii) Budget

2.  PRM will conduct a formal competitive review of all proposals submitted in response to this funding announcement. A review panel of at least three people will evaluate submissions and determine whether and to what extent the applicant’s plan for refugee processing meets the RSC objectives outlined in this NOFO; the overall refugee processing experience of the proposing organization; and the proposal’s cost effectiveness for providing comprehensive service provision to applicants of all ethnic groups and in the context of available funding.

3.  Department of State Review Panels may provide conditions and recommendations on applications to enhance the proposed program, which must be addressed by the applicant before further consideration of the award. To ensure effective use of limited PRM funds, conditions or recommendations may include requests to increase, decrease, clarify, and/or justify costs and program activities.

4.  New PRM Award Data Sheet: Prior to award and upon final negotiation, PRM will ask the selected NGOs to fill out and submit a PRM Award Data Sheet to capture a subset of information from the proposal.

F.  FEDERAL AWARD ADMINISTRATION INFORMATION

1.  Federal Award Administration. A successful applicant can expect to receive a separate notice from PRM stating that an application has been selected before PRM actually makes the federal award. That notice is not an authorization to begin performance. Only the notice of award signed by the grants officer is the authorizing document. Unsuccessful applicants will be notified following completion of the selection and award process.

2.  Administrative and National Policy Requirements. PRM awards are made consistent with the following provisions in the following order of precedence: (a) applicable laws and statutes of the United States, including any specific legislative provisions mandated in the statutory authority for the award; (b) Code of Federal Regulations (CFR); (c) Department of State Standard Terms and Conditions of the award; (d) the award’s specific requirements; and (e) other documents and attachments to the award.

3.  Reporting.
Successful applicants will be required to submit:

(a) Program Reports: PRM requires program reports describing and analyzing the results of activities undertaken during the validity period of the agreement. A program report is required within thirty (30) days following the end of each three month period of performance during the validity period of the agreement. The final program report is due ninety (90) days following the end of the agreement. The submission dates for program reports will be written into the cooperative agreement. Partners receiving multi-year awards should follow this same reporting schedule and should still submit a final program report at the end of each year that summarizes the NGO’s performance during the previous year.

The Performance Progress Report (SF-PPR) is a standard, government-wide performance reporting format. Recipients of PRM funding must submit the signed SF-PPR cover page with each program report. In addition, the Bureau suggests that NGOs receiving PRM funding use the PRM recommended program report template and reference this template as being attached in block 10 of the SF-PPR. This template is designed to ease the reporting requirements while ensuring that all required elements are addressed. The Program Report Template can be requested by sending an email with only the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” (without the quotation marks) in the subject line to PRMNGOCoordinator@state.gov.

(b) Financial Reports: Financial reports are required within thirty (30) days following the end of each calendar year quarter during the validity period of the agreement (January 30th, April 30th, July 30th, October 30th). The final financial report covering the entire period of the agreement is required within ninety (90) days after the expiration date of the agreement. For agreements containing indirect costs, final financial reports are due within sixty (60) days of the finalization of the applicable negotiated indirect cost rate agreement (NICRA).

Reports reflecting expenditures for the recipient’s overseas and United States offices should be completed in accordance with the Federal Financial Report (FFR SF-425) and submitted electronically in the Department of Health and Human Services’ Payment Management System (HHS/PMS) and in accordance with other award specific requirements. Detailed information pertaining to the Federal Financial Report including due dates, instruction manuals and access forms, is provided on the HHS/PMS website at https://pms.psc.gov/

(c) Audit Reports: When a recipient-contracted audit is not required because the Federal award amount is less than the $750,000 threshold, the Department may determine that an audit must be performed and the audit report must be submitted to the responsible grants office(r) for review, dissemination, and resolution as appropriate. The cost of audits required under this policy may be charged either as an allowable direct cost to the award, or included in the organizations established indirect costs in the award’s detailed budget.

G.  PRM CONTACTS

Applicants with technical questions related to this announcement should contact the PRM staff listed below prior to proposal submission. Please note that responses to technical questions from PRM do not indicate a commitment to fund the program discussed.

RSC Africa PRM Program Officers: Sumi Siram, 202-453-9250, SiramS@state.gov, and Cameron McGlothlin, 202-453-9263, McGlothlinCD@state.gov; Washington, D.C.

RSC TuME PRM Program Officer: Sophie Gao, 202-453-9256, GaoY1@state.gov, Washington, D.C.

RSC Eurasia Program Officer: Jennifer Kelley, 202-453-9258, KelleyJA@state.gov, Washington, D.C.

Appendix A: Budget Detail Instructions

The following provides guidance for the preparation of a proposal’s budget detail using PRM’s recommended budget template.

The use of the PRM budget detail template is recommended and estimates should be rounded to the nearest dollar. (Note: Information included in the budget detail should correspond to information in the budget summary and be explained in greater detail in the budget narrative.)

Budget information is required by quarter, and applicants should provide real quarterly budgets, factoring in special events such as conferences or training.

Applicants with current RSC Cooperative Agreements with the Bureau should include the FY 2017 estimated actual spending per line item and provide a rationale in the budget narrative supporting the difference between FY 2017 estimated expenditure and FY 2018 proposed amount.

For policy guidance concerning U.S. Government regulations or admissible expenditure limits, etc., please refer to OMB circular (2 CFR 200). The suggested budget template is provided as Attachment A.

Personnel:

This category includes annual salaries/wages, stipends, consultant fees, allowances, differentials, bonuses or extra months’ salary, and any anticipated termination/severance pay for any personnel to be charged to the proposed agreement. (Note: Headquarters personnel should not be included here, but under Headquarters expenses below)

All positions listed should indicate the amount of time (expressed as a percent), the rate of pay, and the associated unit measurement (hour/month/year) anticipated to fulfill project implementation. For applicants currently managing the RSC, indicate in the Comments section if a position is new or proposed. For consultants, the proposed daily rate to be paid as compensation and the number of consultant days that are anticipated to be paid must be shown.

The Bureau will not authorize personnel positions to be charged based on a flat monthly fee that includes salaries, benefits, travel costs, etc.

If your organization anticipates the payment of employee termination and/or severance pay during the proposed funding period, the Bureau will consider such costs an allowable charge to the agreement to the extent of the Bureau’s responsibility in accordance with each employee’s direct relation to the Bureau’s funded activities. For example, an employee charged to Bureau activities for one-half of their employment with the organization shall have only one half of their termination or severance costs charged to the agreement. Explain anticipated termination or severance expenses in the budget narrative section.

Other types of allowances such as housing and education or differentials must be shown separately and identified against the position to be charged. They should be based on established policies and should be made available to all employees of the organization in similar situations or positions, not just to employees funded by the U.S. government. The Bureau’s policy is to limit the payment of allowances to amounts which do not exceed the rates approved for government employees in similar situations.

Additionally, attach a staff roster with the above information, indicating existing and proposed positions, staff restructuring or reorganization from the previous year (if applicable), an organizational chart, and show total FTE (full-time equivalency) for each type of position in the designated column and actual number of employees occupying each position in the comments column. Attach a copy of your organization’s established salary schedule showing different pay levels and step increases on which the budget is based.

Information on COLA and proposed salary increase or adjustment should be noted in the budget narrative accompanying the budget worksheet.

The comments column of the budget worksheet should specify the number of employees being given each service; i.e., housing for 3 employees; education allowance for 2 children of 2 employees, etc.

Fringe Benefits:

This category should identify the total cost of fringe benefits provided to International Hire and Local Hire employees for which the Bureau will be charged under the agreement. While the cost of individual benefits need not be specified, the total cost, including the percentage of salaries, if appropriate, should be shown. The benefits must be consistent with the organization’s established personnel policies and practices for all of its employees, not just for those employees who may be funded by the government.

Travel:

List local program travel by function in this category (in-country, regional, international, etc.) and type of trip (circuit ride, monitoring, etc.). Headquarters staff travel should be included in the Headquarters Expenses category below. Provide one total for in-country project travel, one total for regional travel, and one total for furlough/home leave travel. All anticipated international trips must be listed individually. Show only the total cost of each trip. Do not itemize by category (airfare, per diem, etc.); rather, list general categories as well as the number of trips included in the trip total in the comments column for each type of travel.

It is the Bureau’s policy not to reimburse organizations for per diem allowances, both overseas and domestic, which exceed the rates approved for government employees. Current rates can be found at the following link: http://aoprals.state.gov/web920/per_diem.asp.

Equipment:

This category must include a complete and detailed listing of all non-expendable equipment anticipated to be purchased for program activities and to be charged to the agreement.

Non-expendable equipment is that which has: 1) a useful life of one year or more and an acquisition cost of $5,000 or more per unit. However, consistent with your policy, lower limits may be used. Your budget must identify which of the above is followed and must be consistently applied to all U.S. government funding arrangements. PRM’s Office of the Comptroller must be informed, in writing, of recipient’s policy and the threshold amount if less than $5,000. Any equipment that may be determined, after the initial budget approval, to be required to meet the program objectives must be specifically approved by the Bureau in writing prior to the purchase. Equipment not included in the approved budget will be considered an unallowable cost under the agreement.

Consolidate like items of lesser value by type of equipment (i.e., telephones, office furniture) with quantities or types to be purchased noted in the comments column. See Appendix C for WRAPS requirements.

List all equipment that will be leased, including vehicles.

For organizations that have not previously received Bureau funding: Include a summary description of your property management procedures that are currently in place. This will be incorporated into the Bureau’s funding arrangements with your organization.

Supplies:

Show all tangible personal property by appropriate category (office supplies, classroom supplies, medical supplies, etc.) that may be purchased and charged under the agreement. The budget narrative should describe the types of items included in each of the categories and the proposed use.

If supplies are needed only for Cultural Orientation activities, such as classroom books, please include as a separate line item.

Contractual Services:

List all proposed sub-contracts or sub-recipients that are anticipated to carry out the proposed program, i.e., security guards, additional personnel, sub-agreements with an implementing partners etc. These agreements are subject to the regulations set forth in 22 CFR 145.

Other Direct Expenses:

Include any other direct cost not clearly covered herein. Examples are computer use, telephone, postage, space rental (list projected rental items), audit fees, insurance, printing/duplicating, utilities, etc. Each item must be listed separately showing an estimated cost.

Headquarters Expenses:

Include any anticipated U.S. domestic or international travel of headquarters staff in support of this program as well as any personnel costs or other expenses to be directly charged by the organization to the program (for personnel, include percentage of time dedicated to this program).

Other Refugee Processing Expenses:

Include any anticipated costs related to refugee processing which do not fit in any other category, such as medical exam fees for panel physicians.

Indirect Costs:

Show the amount of indirect costs and the base amount on which it is determined. It should be indicated whether the rate has been approved by a government cognizant agency and the type of rate (provisional, predetermined or fixed). A copy of the current Negotiated Indirect Cost Rate Agreement must be submitted for the recipient and sub-recipient(s), if applicable. Inclusion of indirect costs must be in compliance with the Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards, (OMB Circular 2 CFR Part 200).

Comments:

Comments are not required for every budget line item. This column provides space for further identification of items included in the budget categories. For example, under travel, total cost for each trip should be provided under the “Proposed Budget” column, with the number of trips and items included in the costs, e.g., airfare, per diem, taxis, etc., specified under “Comments.” The Comments column is not intended to replace the Narrative section.


Appendix B: Budget Narrative Instructions

The purpose of the budget narrative is to explain the costs that PRM expects an organization to include in each budget category. Please include all information in the budget narrative that is included in the budget detail spreadsheet.

Applicants with current RSC Cooperative Agreements with the Bureau should provide a justification for and clearly explain any changes made to the prior year’s budget.

The budget narrative should include the following:

Personnel:

Identify each position and indicate its support of the project and/or sector(s). If not provided in the budget detail, indicate the numerical justification for the total cost.

For example, RSC Director – This individual is responsible for the overall management of the RSC. He/she is responsible for compliance with all the terms and conditions of the agreement including implementation, program and financial reporting. $85,000/year x 100% of time = $85,000.

Identify consultants separately from other permanent staff. If possible, include anticipated position title(s), the proposed daily rate to be paid as compensation, and the number of consultant days that are anticipated.

Fringe Benefits:

If an established NICRA includes a rate for fringe benefits, please ensure that you utilize and/or adjust the rate appropriately.

If the fringe benefit rate is not included in the NICRA, please provide a copy of the company policy and/or rates (as a percentage) that are being charged per category of benefits.

Travel:

All travel must be identified via mode of travel, departure and arrival city, purpose, unit of measurement, and duration of trip. Please note that the movement of project participants and supplies is a separate transportation line item.

For example, 10 in-country trips will be undertaken to conduct case processing. Roundtrip airfare from Kinshasa to Goma for 5 employees is anticipated. Each trip will include 5 days of per diem per employee.
  •  In-country Airfare – 10 trips x 5 employees x $200 = $10,000
  • Lodging – 10 trips x 5 employees x 5 days x $161/day = $40,250
  • Per diem – 10 trips x 5 employees x 5 days x $57 = $14,250
Equipment:

Include a detailed listing of all non-expendable equipment anticipated to be purchased for program activities including justification.

For example, Land Rover – Due to the challenging road conditions, inclement weather, terrain conditions, and geographical location(s) of project sites, it is deemed reasonable and necessary to purchase a new vehicle. Vehicle x 1 quantity = $40,000

Supplies:

General Office supplies include the following items: pens, pencils, notebooks, printer paper, ink cartridges, etc.

For example:
  • 12 months x $100/month x 3 project offices = $3,600
  • Due to the opening of a new project office to support DHS circuit rides, project supplies include the following items: 2 laptop computers, 3 desktop computers, 2 printers, etc.
  • 2 laptop computers x $700 = $1,400
  • 3 desktop computers x $1,200 = $3,600
  • 2 printers x $400 = $800
Contractual:

Include the purpose and scope of work for contractual services as well as the budgeted amount.
Detailed budgets should be included for sub-grantees/sub-awards.

Other:

Include all other direct project expenses that are related to the implementation of all sector activities and are proportionate based on actual use.

For example:
  • Rent of Office space in three locations – 12 months x 3 offices x $400 = $14,400
  • Utilities – 12 months x 3 offices x $100 = $3,600
  • Postage – 12 months x 3 offices x $50 = $1,800
  • Courier – 25 trips x 2 offices x $25 = $1,250
  • Communication (phone, fax, internet) = 12 months x 3 offices x $200 = $7,200
  • Transportation cost of case files via ground freight = 2 trips x $3,000 = $6,000
Headquarters Expenses:

As in the budget detail spreadsheet, please identify all Headquarters expenses in a separate category.

Include headquarters positions and indicate their support of the project and/or sector(s) as well as percentage of time dedicated to the program. Provide a numerical justification for the cost.

Include any anticipated U.S. domestic or international travel of headquarters staff in support of this program as well as any other expenses such as administrative costs to be directly charged by the organization to the program.

Other Refugee Processing Expenses:

As in the budget detail spreadsheet, please include all expenses related to refugee processing that do not fit in any other category.

Indirect Costs:

Show the amount of indirect costs and the base amount on which it is determined. A copy of the current Negotiated Indirect Cost Rate Agreement must be submitted for recipient and sub-recipient(s) as applicable. Inclusion of indirect costs must be in compliance with the Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards, (OMB Circular 2 CFR Part 200).


Appendix C: WRAPS Equipment/Software Requirements

Please note the equipment listed below is the “minimum” requirements. The RSC may exceed any of the recommendations. Should the RSC replace a previous RSC in the same location, and find that the existing hardware does not meet the minimum requirements specified in this document, the new RSC staff will be responsible for any and all necessary upgrades.

Facility Server/IT Room

The RSC is responsible for providing and maintaining an IT server room capable of housing all the necessary networking, computer, and telephony hardware required to support the business operations of an RSC. This includes space, power (minimum two-15amp circuits per device), enterprise UPS (uninterruptible power supply) solution, cooling, and fire suppression solution.

The RSC will hold in reserve the necessary IT server capacity (i.e. space, power, enterprise UPS (uninterruptible power supply) solution, and cooling) required to provide colocation services for a WRAPS on premise solution (see WRAPS on Premise Colocation Requirements section for details.).

Networking
  • CISCO 3945 Routers – minimum 2
  • U.S. manufactured commercial grade switch(es) – minimum 2
Firewall
  • A pair of firewalls (with VLAN separation) and IPSec VPN tunnel to the RPC
  • The RPC recommends deployment of a high availability next generation firewall (NGFW) solution to ensure the ability to connect to WRAPS. The RPC recommends firewalls developed by US based companies such as Cisco, McAfee, Palo Alto Networks, etc. The RPC can assist in reviewing firewall designs and features. NGFW allows for advance threat protection, application protection, denial of service mitigation, and URL filtering.
Structured Cabling (wireless access is prohibited)
  • Cat 5E/6 UTP (plenum or low smoke)
  • Cable run from wall jacks to patch panel in wiring closet
  • RJ45 patch cables to connect PC to wall jacks
  • RJ45 patch cables to connect patch panel to LAN switches
Telecommunications

The RSC must have an Internet Service Provider (ISP) with a minimum of:
  1. 50/50 MB dedicated link
  2. IP subnet with at least 14 usable host addresses
RSC Office Operations

Server Hardware to function as an RSC

The following minimum equipment/software is required to interface with WRAPS. If not already available, it should be included in the proposal.

Domain Controller
  • 1 Dual Core Processor 64-bit
  • 8 GB RAM
  • 2 – 80 GB SATA Disk Drives
  • CD-RW/DVD-ROM
Enterprise Level Microsoft Exchange & File Server (2 Servers)
  • 2 Dual Core Processors 64-bit
  • Minimum 16 GB RAM
  • Minimum 2TB Storage
  • CD-RW/DVD-ROM
  • RAID Controller
  • Tape Drive for backups
  • Redundant Power Supply
  • Redundant Fan Kit
Server Software

All non-WRAPS Servers
  • Windows Server 2008 R2 or higher
  • Commercial grade Anti-Virus Software
  • Automated patch management and compliance reporting
  • Backup Software
Required Peripherals
  • Network Printer(s)
  • Network Label Printer (Zebra LP2844 is utilized at the RPC)
  • Digital Camera
  • Double-sided Image Scanner
  • Copy Machine(s)
  • Fax Machine(s)/Service
Telephony System

All caseworkers and supervisors must have access to a telephony solution that provides the ability to make and receive local and long distance phone calls. This may be achieved via a third party VOIP solution, traditional telephony provider, or a combination of both.

Workstation Desktops

Each caseworker and each supervisor at the RSC must have at least a 64-bit capable Intel or AMD desktop computer with the following minimum requirements:

Workstation Hardware
  • Minimum 8 GB RAM
  • Minimum 80 GB Hard Disk
  • CD/DVD-ROM Drive
  • 4 USB Ports
  • 17-in Monitor
Workstation Software
  • Windows 7 Professional or Enterprise
  • Microsoft Office 2010
  • Microsoft Internet Explorer 9.0 or higher
  • Chrome
  • Adobe Acrobat Reader
  • Anti-Virus Software
Security
  • Security for the WRAPS components will be provided.
  • For non-WRAPS servers, routers, firewall, and switches, they should be installed in a secure area to prevent unauthorized access to the server consoles. Configuration and management should adhere to United States’ Federal Information Security Act (FISMA) 800-53 controls as well as Department of State’s Foreign Affairs Manual (FAM) and Foreign Affairs Handbook (FAH). Security guidance for an RSC will be provided. This guidance will provide a list of security controls that should be followed by an RSC.
Information Assurance
  • RSCs should ensure all staff review and sign applicable Rules of Behavior/Acceptable Use Policy within 30 days of receiving an account. This policy defines the local RSC rules users must follow and acceptable use of the system.
  • RSCs should develop a formal process to ensure all processing staff receive initial and yearly Information Awareness training. RSCs should maintain a current roster of general users and those that maintain elevated privileges (i.e. Administrators)
  • The RPC provides the curriculum to facilitate both general training geared towards all staff and privileged user training, which covers advanced principles of IT Security, policies, and procedures.
Backup and disaster recovery
  • The RSC is responsible for an enterprise level backup and recovery solution that includes the backup of all servers with regular weekly rotation full backups held offsite for a minimum of 6 months. All backup data must be encrypted at rest.
Circuit Ride Laptops
  • The Circuit Ride server itself, containing the WRAPS application, will be provided. Include all other equipment required to use the circuit ride server in the field.
Hardware – laptops to connect to Circuit Ride server
  • Workstations/laptops, LAN equipment and switches for circuit ride processing are determined by local circuit ride requirements
  • The workstations and/or laptops should have BitLocker or equivalent encryption
  • Any external devices should be encrypted (for instance Ironkey Thumbdrives should be used)
  • Printers, Label Printers, Scanners, Digital Cameras, etc. as needed
WRAPS Colocation Requirements (for Kenya only)
  1. 20U of continuous rack space
  2. Power and cooling for 200 amps/3500watts
  3. Dedicated 50/50 MB connection to internet
  4. Router cross connect between RSC router and WRAPS colocation router
Additional Information:

The RPC utilizes HP equipment for servers, desktops, and network printers. Both AMD and Intel-based processors are acceptable for desktops. Also, Cisco is the preferred manufacturer for the networking/security infrastructure. US subscription-based anti-malware/anti-virus products is preferred . Symantec is utilized at the RPC and has been verified to not interfere with WRAPS operations.

Secretary Tillerson Issues Statement On the Republic of Sierra Leone’s National Day

Department of State
Washington, DC
April 27, 2017

On behalf of the American people, best wishes to the people of Sierra Leone as you celebrate the anniversary of your independence on April 27.

We value the continued partnership between our countries and the ties between our people.

The United States remains committed to working with your government to support Sierra Leone’s efforts to grow economically, strengthen its democracy, and ensure the well-being of all its citizens.

Congratulations on your 56th anniversary and best wishes for a year filled with peace and prosperity.

Secretary Tillerson Issues Statement On the Republic of Togo’s National Day

Department of State
Washington, DC
April 27, 2017

On behalf of the American people, we send our best wishes to the people of Togo as you celebrate the anniversary of your independence on April 27.

Your offer to host the 2017 Africa Growth and Opportunity Act Forum attests to your efforts to provide greater economic opportunity to the people of Togo. We will continue to support Togo’s ongoing efforts to promote mutually beneficial trade, attract investment, and assure safety and security for all its citizens.

Congratulations on your 57th anniversary and best wishes for a year filled with peace and prosperity.

Secretary Tillerson Issues Statement On South Africa’s National Day

Department of State
Washington, DC
April 27, 2017

On behalf of President Trump and the American people, I congratulate all South Africans as you observe the 23rd anniversary of Freedom Day.

On this day commemorating your first democratic elections, we reflect on South Africa’s legacy of political and economic leadership in Africa and acknowledge our strong and broad partnership based on shared goals of security, democracy, and prosperity.

Secretary Tillerson Issues Statement On the United Republic of Tanzania’s National Day

Department of State
Washington, DC
April 26, 2017

On behalf of President Trump and the American people, I congratulate the people of Tanzania as you celebrate the 53rd anniversary of the United Republic of Tanzania.

Tanzania and the United States have had a strong relationship, marked by a collaborative effort toward shared goals and close cooperation on a variety of programs and initiatives, from health and education, promoting economic growth and democratic governance, and advancing regional security. In the coming year, we look forward to building on our shared accomplishments as we continue with our efforts.

As Tanzanians gather to celebrate Union Day, I share the hopes of the Tanzanian people for a peaceful, healthy, and productive future.